The Snow Flurry (1959)

“The Snow Flurry (1959)” may be one of the lesser known works among Keisuke Kinoshita’s filmography, but gives its audience ultimately satisfying experience. It experiments with a bold and complex flashback structure, which is firmly rooted in the emotional journey of the protagonists. The audience is guided through sometimes parallel, sometimes intersecting psychological paths of the disintegrating members of the family as if the cinematic lens has become an entity of flow of consciousness. Continue reading “The Snow Flurry (1959)”

Policeman’s Diary (1955)

Nikkatsu had been in turmoil for more than a decade. The studio had lost its production unit in 1942, and the business had been in shambles. Kyuusaku Hori, CEO of the company, tried to rebuild the business by investing in the areas other than movie business such as hotels, real state development, and entertainment management. However, there were lots of people who wanted Nikkatsu to do what it was supposed to do. Making movies. In 1954, Nikkatsu opened its new studio in Chofu, Tokyo and restarted the film production. The studio is still in operation today, even though it is reduced to one-fourth in its size. This film was one of the earliest efforts to put the Japan’s oldest studio back in the map of entertainment industry. Continue reading “Policeman’s Diary (1955)”

An Elegant Life of Mr. Everyman (1963)

It was the year 1963. Just one year before Tokyo Olympic. People were pretty much occupied with the economic boom and speed of capitalism. Life is fun. You work and get paid. There are so many fun things in life. Playing sports is fun. Rock and roll music is fun. Spending nights with your friends, your girl or boy, or your family is fun. Or is it? Continue reading “An Elegant Life of Mr. Everyman (1963)”